Jon Rappoport – Support GMO Labeling Or Turn The Oil Tanker Around? – 21 November 2014

jon7Face it, America is in a shopping trance. A consumer trance. A buying trance.

So it’s natural that the more “enlightened shoppers” would see labeling GMO foods as a way to create a revolution.

Inside that bubble-trance, labels feel like a revolution.

The fact that Monsanto keeps selling high-level poison (Roundup) and Monsanto’s genes drift from plant to plant across the landscape doesn’t make an impact, because people don’t palpably encounter those elements when they look at food products on shelves.

Which is where they live when they aren’t living at home. In stores. Moving along aisles. Putting things in carts.

A GMO label on those things, or a non-GMO label, is as far as the eye can see.

The labels are also symbols: “I’m doing good in the world by making the right choice. I’m helping the planet. The Universe is looking at my shopping cart and nodding Yes.”

Meanwhile, more toxic Roundup blows across America. More Monsanto genes drift from plant to plant, infecting them, changing them.

But the shopper is happy.

On this foundation of sand, the GMO-labeling movement in America was launched and bankrolled, calling itself a revolution.

People in other countries, many of which have already instituted outright bans on GMOs, look at America and think, “What is wrong with those people?”

They can frame that question because they’re outside the shopping trance.

If you look up the major funders of the GMO-labeling ballot initiatives, you’ll see that they, too, are outside the trance. They’re businessmen, and they sell non-GMO food to the shoppers.

They have a (self-serving) vision: when enough foods products in stores are labeled, consumers will choose the non-GMO products and put Monsanto out of business.

That will happen when a feather beats away a monsoon.

The labeling funders and their advocates also carry with them, like an ID, the following assumption:

“Americans are too dumb to understand what havoc Monsanto is actually wreaking; therefore, we can only approach them as consumers.”

This premise has never been tested in battle conditions. But it could be. Now.

Some of you know that Maui voters recently passed a ban against all new Monsanto/Dow GMOs in their county. Well, a judge has unconstitutionally put a temporary block on that, and Monsanto and Dow have sued the county.

If the natural and organic businessmen, who bankroll these losing labeling ballot-initiatives, called a time out, they could turn their ship around and pursue a new venture.

They could hire a team of lawyers who take no prisoners, a real PR agency (not one who represents Coke and Pepsi), some pro advertising people, and flood Maui (and the online planet) with what I’d call “Monsanto crime reports.”

Bold in-your-face support for the people of Maui, who executed a ban on GMOs.

Broadcast the triumph of Maui and the criminal actions of the judge and Monsanto/Dow, non-stop.

Do something right for a change.

Surpass the shopping trance.

Invent a new reality. The deceptive reality of labeling was invented. So try a different one.

Make it mean something.

Or confess you’re not in the battle to win; you just want to sell GMO labels.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com. / www.jonrappoport.wordpress.com / link to original aritcle

 

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